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Slow-motion collisions of tectonic plates under the ocean drag about three times more water down into the deep Earth than previously believed, according to a seismic study that spans the Mariana Trench. The observations from the deepest ocean trench in the world have important implications for the global water cycle, researchers say. “People knew that
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Researchers have developed catalysts that can convert carbon dioxide—the main cause of global warming—into plastics, fabrics, resins, and other products. The electrocatalysts are the first materials, aside from enzymes, that can turn carbon dioxide and water into carbon building blocks containing one, two, three, or four carbon atoms with more than 99 percent efficiency. Two
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Between Earth and the galactic core, there’s an old, faint star that appears to have something orbiting it, something that’s confusing astronomers. The discovery joins several other stellar objects that have perplexed researchers in recent years, inviting suggestions as mundane as dust and as imaginative as extra-terrestrial technology. Whatever is responsible, it helps to have
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The willow warbler is not one to stop and smell the flowers. Weighing in at a mere 10 grams (3.5 ounces), this restless little songbird regularly traverses multiple continents, flying thousands of kilometres and taking remarkably few breaks. In fact, researchers in Sweden have now determined this epic trek by the Siberian willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus yakutensis) constitutes the
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Humanity is likely responsible for the death of yet another sperm whale. After it washed ashore Kapota Island in the Wakatobi National Park in Indonesia, park officials found its stomach full of plastic. Over 1,000 individual pieces were found, including 115 plastic cups, 25 plastic bags, two flip-flops, and a sack containing over 1,000 pieces
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For the first time, brain tissue grown in a lab has spontaneously exhibited electrical activity, and it looks startlingly similar to human brain activity. More specifically, it resembles the brain activity of premature babies. Now, the report of this startling development is yet to be peer-reviewed, but if confirmed, it could be a huge discovery
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For the first time, brain tissue grown in a lab has spontaneously exhibited electrical activity, and it looks startlingly similar to human brain activity. More specifically, it resembles the brain activity of premature babies. Now, the report of this startling development is yet to be peer-reviewed, but if confirmed, it could be a huge discovery